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Lake View Elementary School Save the Woods Campaign

-- on the north side of Madison
 

~Even on a cold gray early-spring day, Lake View Elementary School children are brimming with enthusiasm, curiosity and smiles as they play beneath a skeletal canopy of mature oak trees. Being able to physically connect with nature on a daily basis benefits these students in many ways, thanks to the state designated Lake View Elementary School Forest—and the school staff members who weave this on-site natural space into school curriculum to create enriched, hands-on learning experiences. The benefits don’t stop there, though. They ripple out to the students’ families, community, and toward the future of our natural environment...

Lake View Elementary School was built in an oak woodland – a forest that provides a natural place for students to learn about the world.   The 2-acre forest has been designated as a school forest, a DNR program that helps communities create outdoor classrooms.

Unfortunately, some of the forest is slated for development, and this is where our expertise in land protection comes into play. Our goal is to purchase about 0.6 acres of land from Habitat for Humanity, including the biggest unprotected trees, and add them to the school’s outdoor classroom. This will expand the size of the school forest by 1/3, providing much-needed space for student activities. Click here for a map.

The Lake View Elementary School project will directly benefit the ~260 students who attend the school every year. Nearly 80% of the students come from low-income families, typically living in apartments with no yard in which to play and explore. With many parents working long hours, and some without money for family outings, the school’s forest has become the place for students to explore and play. Five years ago the woodlands were off limits to the teachers/students, until the school realized what a gem they had. Now classes learn to grow plants, tap maple trees, write, do math and science, draw, play music, focus, calm down, and relax before returning to the classroom. 

The total project cost (including the land purchase, transaction costs, and a nature station to be built by Operation Fresh Start) is $161,000. 

Donate now to Save the Woods

Just type: "Save the Woods" in the notes section

 

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10,982 ACRES

of cherished local land since 1983

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